estefania

Caitlin Stasey being the hero we all deserve.

(Source: brennacarver, via shantrinas)

— 37 minutes ago with 23891 notes

the beyoncé challenge:

[3/6] favorite music videos - blow

(via thequeenbey)

— 41 minutes ago with 1470 notes

whenthegloryfades:

actuallyclintbarton:

tittily:

tenouttatenasses:

sandandglass:

Source

That’s the nicest thing I’ve seen today.

imagine being that one guy who broke an 11 hour kindness chain

It was 11 hours later and we don’t know what time it started.

The guy who broke it was probably whoever locked up for the night.

Is no one else confused by the concept of a starbucks drive through?

— 43 minutes ago with 143405 notes
littlemissmutant:


Within three days of becoming engaged, I had already been told that I shouldn’t wear my glasses, because they’re not bridal. I was told my cane wasn’t bridal. I was told my eye… was not bridal. And I realized that if I was going to be “bridal” in their eyes, I was going to have to change who I am. I am proudly disabled.

This photo is giving me LIFE

littlemissmutant:

Within three days of becoming engaged, I had already been told that I shouldn’t wear my glasses, because they’re not bridal. I was told my cane wasn’t bridal. I was told my eye… was not bridal. And I realized that if I was going to be “bridal” in their eyes, I was going to have to change who I am. I am proudly disabled.

This photo is giving me LIFE

(Source: offbeatbride.com, via jessehimself)

— 54 minutes ago with 19015 notes
gedankenspaziergang asked: hi:) Could you explain why Zoe Saldana is problematic? thank you


Answer:

angrywocunited:

Sure!

"Yeah. Morgan Freeman said it. And I was just told this when I was doing an interview: He’s not going to talk about racism. I’m not going to talk about it. Yeah, it’s an elephant. We all see it, we all know it, but I’m not going to carry it in my heart, because I want to be a person that embodies change. Not embodies war or battles or bitterness; I want to keep moving on."

We have a Black president right now, so why the f— would I sit down and talk about how hard it is for Black women in Hollywood when there’s a Black president in my country?” Zoe Saldana Ebony Magazine

  • And finally, this abomination:

image

Donning a blackface and a fake nose to portray Nina Simone, a dark skinned black woman who struggled immensely with her blackness throughout her entire life. This is a direct slap in the face to Simone’s legacy and dark skinned black women. If Saldana really cared about Simone (she doesn’t), understood her personal struggles (again, she doesn’t), she would have turned down the role and given it to an actress that is more suitable to play Simone (I nominate Adepero Oduye). She doesn’t realize the amount of privilege she has in Hollywood being a conventionally attractive, skinny, light skin black woman. What’s so irritating about this casting is at the end of the day Saldana can easily remove the dark skin, the wide nose, and Simone’s adversity but Nina Simone couldn’t do that.  -G

— 59 minutes ago with 2404 notes
let-them-eat-cake21:

dynastylnoire:

a-wanderlustsoul:

postracialcomments:


The ACLU of Louisiana has come to the defenseof a Rastafarian boy who has been suspended from school and forbidden to return until he cuts his dreadlocks.
The boy was sent home from South Plaquemines High School when classes resumed Aug. 8 because his dreadlocks extended beyond the collar of his shirt, in apparent violation of the school dress code.
After he returned to school the following week with his hair pinned up, school officials told the student his dreadlocks remained in violation.
Rastafarians believeLeviticus 21:5forbids them to cut their hair, and dreadlocks are central to their religious beliefs.
“The wearing of dreadlocks for (the student) is akin to the wearing of a religious icon by another student,” the ACLU said in a letter sent Monday to the Plaquemines Parish School Board.
The student’s mother provided a letter to the school superintendent from the 1st Church of Rastafar I that indicated the boy’s family were members and explained the importance of dreadlocks to their faith.
The superintendent told the teen’s mother that was not sufficient to allow the dreadlocks, and when she asked what documentation would be required, he told the mother he wasn’t a lawyer.
“We would object if the school were to tell a Christian student they could not wear a cross or if it were to permit the wearing of religious icons of one faith and prohibited those of another faith,” the civil rights group said. “In discriminating against (the student’s) religious beliefs, the school is expressing a preference for certain religions, which is unacceptable.”
Although the school has not formally suspended the student, he has missed 10 of the first 11 days of the school year over his dreadlocks.
“The actions of the school and Superintendent (Denis) Rousselle are the equivalent of an unlimited suspension,” the ACLU said.
The ACLU said the school had violated the student’s constitutional rights, as well as Louisiana’s Preservation of Religious Freedom Act.
That 2010 law imposes “strict scrutiny” on any burden of religious liberty, which in this case would force the school district to demonstrate a compelling interest in requiring the student to cut his hair.
“(The student) will be able to prove that his dreadlocks and hair length are a sincerely held religious belief of his Rastafari religion,” the ACLU said. “It is also a method of self-expression, because it communicates to others an important fact about (the student): that he is a Rastafari for whom traditional religious practices are important to him and his family. By refusing to allow him to attend school, the Board is violating (his) statutory and constitutional rights.”

ACLU Letter
Source

This. is. why. i. don’t. fuck. with. white. people. and. locs. this. doesn’t. happen. to. you.

Where’s all the white people that want to wear dreads now?

^

let-them-eat-cake21:

dynastylnoire:

a-wanderlustsoul:

postracialcomments:

The ACLU of Louisiana has come to the defenseof a Rastafarian boy who has been suspended from school and forbidden to return until he cuts his dreadlocks.

The boy was sent home from South Plaquemines High School when classes resumed Aug. 8 because his dreadlocks extended beyond the collar of his shirt, in apparent violation of the school dress code.

After he returned to school the following week with his hair pinned up, school officials told the student his dreadlocks remained in violation.

Rastafarians believeLeviticus 21:5forbids them to cut their hair, and dreadlocks are central to their religious beliefs.

“The wearing of dreadlocks for (the student) is akin to the wearing of a religious icon by another student,” the ACLU said in a letter sent Monday to the Plaquemines Parish School Board.

The student’s mother provided a letter to the school superintendent from the 1st Church of Rastafar I that indicated the boy’s family were members and explained the importance of dreadlocks to their faith.

The superintendent told the teen’s mother that was not sufficient to allow the dreadlocks, and when she asked what documentation would be required, he told the mother he wasn’t a lawyer.

“We would object if the school were to tell a Christian student they could not wear a cross or if it were to permit the wearing of religious icons of one faith and prohibited those of another faith,” the civil rights group said. “In discriminating against (the student’s) religious beliefs, the school is expressing a preference for certain religions, which is unacceptable.”

Although the school has not formally suspended the student, he has missed 10 of the first 11 days of the school year over his dreadlocks.

“The actions of the school and Superintendent (Denis) Rousselle are the equivalent of an unlimited suspension,” the ACLU said.

The ACLU said the school had violated the student’s constitutional rights, as well as Louisiana’s Preservation of Religious Freedom Act.

That 2010 law imposes “strict scrutiny” on any burden of religious liberty, which in this case would force the school district to demonstrate a compelling interest in requiring the student to cut his hair.

“(The student) will be able to prove that his dreadlocks and hair length are a sincerely held religious belief of his Rastafari religion,” the ACLU said. “It is also a method of self-expression, because it communicates to others an important fact about (the student): that he is a Rastafari for whom traditional religious practices are important to him and his family. By refusing to allow him to attend school, the Board is violating (his) statutory and constitutional rights.”

ACLU Letter

Source

This. is. why. i. don’t. fuck. with. white. people. and. locs. this. doesn’t. happen. to. you.

Where’s all the white people that want to wear dreads now?

^

(via themodernisis)

— 1 hour ago with 2013 notes
telstar-5:

8日目のコンクリート

telstar-5:

8日目のコンクリート

(via themodernisis)

— 1 hour ago with 2152 notes